Collaborative practice: can work based learning benefit both students and healthcare professionals?

  • J McCartney University of the Western Cape
  • R Coetzee University of the Western Cape
  • M Salasa New Somerset Hospital
  • C De Beer New Somerset Hospital

Abstract

Experiential learning is well recognised as a means of developing problem solving skills, where the contextual transfer of learning encourages application of knowledge in order to solve real life problems.1-4 Clinical placements involving students in direct patient care can provide diverse, practical, real world experiences that really encourage active learning.5 In line with this evidence of the educational benefits of experiential learning programmes, the South African Pharmacy Council (SAPC) requires providers of pharmacy education in South Africa to include a minimum of 400 hours of structured experiential learning over the four year undergraduate pharmacy programme.6 A component of these 400 hours occurs when final year pharmacy students from the University of the Western Cape (UWC) spend 10 weeks in local hospitals and clinics, providing pharmaceutical care and other patient-focused activities. One assignment that is completed during the clinical rotations focuses on in-service training, the topic and format of which is identified by pharmacists at the clinical site.

Author Biographies

J McCartney, University of the Western Cape

School of Pharmacy, University of the Western Cape, Cape Town

R Coetzee, University of the Western Cape

School of Pharmacy, University of the Western Cape, Cape Town

M Salasa, New Somerset Hospital

Department of Pharmacy, New Somerset Hospital, Cape Town

C De Beer, New Somerset Hospital

Department of Pharmacy, New Somerset Hospital, Cape Town

Published
2020-05-19
Section
Cum Laude