Young Scientist Award 2007

  • Samantha Pillay
  • Viness Pillay
  • Yahya Choonara
  • Girish Modi
  • Sunny Iyuke
  • P Dankwerts

Abstract

The blood brain barrier (BBB) proves a major obstacle for drug delivery to the CNS and with only 1% of drugs able to penetrate the BBB, effective treatment for disorders such as Parkinson’s Disease (PD) is needed. Current therapy available for the treatment of PD gives rise to numerous side-effects and lack prolonged efficacy. A nano-enabled polymeric device implanted into the subarachnoid cavity of the brain may circumvent these challenges as drug is targeted to the affected areas of the brain and therefore a lower effective dose is required. The major benefit of an implantable device will be sustained release of drug which is imperative to prevent the ‘end-of-dose wearing-off’ phenomenon. The device will prove superior in that it serves to overcome the major barriers of current drug delivery systems available for the treatment of PD.

Author Biographies

Samantha Pillay
University of the Witwatersrand, Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology
Viness Pillay
University of the Witwatersrand, Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology
Yahya Choonara
University of the Witwatersrand, Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology
Girish Modi
University of the Witwatersrand, Department of Neurology, Division of Neurosciences
Sunny Iyuke
University of the Witwatersrand, School of Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering
P Dankwerts
University of the Witwatersrand, Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology
Section
Cum Laude